Air Lease

Air Lease may refer to:

Air Lease Corporation, a major international aircraft leasing company headquartered in Los Angeles, CA.
Aircraft lease
Commercial Aircraft Sales and Leasing

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Air Lease.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

서양야동

USS Mount Hood

USS Mount Hood may refer to:

USS Mount Hood (AE-11), was an ammunition ship in service during World War II in the Pacific Ocean
USS Mount Hood (AE-29), was an ammunition ship in service from 1971 to 1999

This article includes a list of ships with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific ship led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended ship article, if one exists.

19금

Trichomonasvirus

Trichomonasvirus

Virus classification

Group:
Group III (dsRNA)

Family:
Totiviridae

Genus:
Trichomonasvirus

Type Species

Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1

Trichomonasvirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Totiviridae. Protozoan parasite trichomonas vaginalis serve as natural hosts. There are currently four species in this genus, including the type species Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1.[1][2]

Contents

1 Taxonomy
2 Structure
3 Life Cycle
4 References
5 External links

Taxonomy[edit]
Group: dsRNA

Order: Unassigned

Family: Totiviridae

Genus: Trichomonasvirus 

Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1
Trichomonas vaginalis virus 2
Trichomonas vaginalis virus 3
Trichomonas vaginalis virus 4

[2]
Structure[edit]
Viruses in Trichomonasvirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral geometries, and T=2 symmetry. The diameter is around 36 nm. Genomes are linear and non-segmented, around 4.6-4.9kb in length. The genome has 2 open reading frames.[1]

Genus
Structure
Symmetry
Capsid
Genomic Arrangement
Genomic Segmentation

Trichomonasvirus
Icosahedral
T=2
Non-Enveloped
Linear

Life Cycle[edit]
Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment to host receptors, which mediates endocytosis. Replication follows the double-stranded RNA virus replication model. Double-stranded RNA virus transcription is the method of transcription. Protozoan parasite trichomonas vaginalis serve as the natural host.[1]

Genus
Host Details
Tissue Tropism
Entry Details
Release Details
Replication Site
Assembly Site
Transmission

Trichomonasvirus
Protozoa
Endocytosis
Unknown
Unknown
Cytoplasm
Cytoplasm
Unknown

References[edit]

^ a b c “Viral Zone”. ExPASy. Retrieved 13 August 2015. 
^ a b ICTV. “Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release”. Retrieved 13 August 2015. 

External links[edit]

Viralzone: Trichomonasvirus
ICTV

v
t
e

Baltimore (virus classification)

DNA

 
I: dsDNA viruses

Caudovirales

Myoviridae
Podoviridae
Siphoviridae

Herpesvirales

Alloherpesviridae
Herpesviridae
Malacoherpesviridae

Ligamenvirales

Lipothrixviridae
Rudiviridae

Unassigned

NLCDV: Ascoviridae
Asfarviridae
Iridoviridae
Marseilleviridae
Mimiviridae
Phycodnaviridae
Poxviridae
genera: Dinodnavirus

nonenveloped: Adenoviridae
Papillomaviridae
Papovaviridae (obsolete)
Polyomaviridae
genera: Rhizidiovirus

Ampullaviridae
Baculoviridae
Bicaudaviridae
Clavaviridae
Corticoviri
성인토렌트

RAF Hornchurch

RAF Hornchurch

Station Crest

IATA: none
ICAO: none

Summary

Airport type
Military

Owner
Air Ministry

Operator
Royal Flying Corps
Royal Air Force

Location
Hornchurch

Built
1915 and 1928

In use
3 October 1915 – 31 December 1919,
(As Sutton’s Farm),
1 April 1928 – 1 July 1962,
(As RAF Hornchurch)

Elevation AMSL
36 ft / 11 m

Coordinates
51°32′19″N 000°12′17″E / 51.53861°N 0.20472°E / 51.53861; 0.20472Coordinates: 51°32′19″N 000°12′17″E / 51.53861°N 0.20472°E / 51.53861; 0.20472

Map

RAF Hornchurch

Location in London

Runways

Direction
Length
Surface

ft
m

00/00
0
0
Grass

Royal Air Force Station Hornchurch or RAF Hornchurch was an airfield in the parish of Hornchurch, Essex (now the London Borough of Havering in Greater London), located to the southeast of Romford. The airfield was known as Sutton’s Farm during the First World War, when it occupied 90 acres (360,000 m2) of the farm of the same name. It was used for the protection of London, being 14 miles (22.5 km) east north-east of Charing Cross. Although the airfield closed shortly after the end of World War I, the land was requisitioned in 1923 because of the expansion of the Royal Air Force and it re-opened as a much larger fighter station in 1928. The airfield was ideally located in bomb alley to cover both London and the Thames corridor from German air attacks. It was a key air force installation between both wars and into the jet age, closing in 1962.

Contents

1 History
2 Inter War Years
3 World War II
4 The Airfield Today
5 Controversy

5.1 William Leefe Robinson
5.2 Use of Incendiary Ammunition
5.3 The Battle of Barking Creek

6 Notable Station Commanders
7 Squadrons
8 See also
9 References

9.1 Notes
9.2 Citations
9.3 Bibliography

10 External links

History[edit]

A Royal Aircraft Factory BE2c similar to those that flew from Sutton’s Farm in 1915 and 1916

Lt. William Leefe Robinson (left) and Lt. Wulstan Tempest, both of whom shot down enemy airships.

In 1915 the London Air Defence Area (LADA) was established and a number of airfields were constructed around London with the specific aim of defending the capital from the growing threat from enemy airships. Sutton’s Farm, along with its neighbour Hainault Farm (just east of what became the Second World War airfield of Fairlop), 8 miles (12.9 km) to the north-east, were selected due to their locati
방앗간

Justice Lacy

Justice Lacy may refer to:

Benjamin W. Lacy, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia
Elizabeth B. Lacy, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia
Thomas J. Lacy, an Associate Justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Justice Lacy.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

19다모아

Peter Sanz

Peter Sanz, O.P.

Martyrs Saint of China

Born
22 September 1680
Ascó, Spain

Died
26 May 1747
Fuzhou, China

Venerated in
Roman Catholic Church

Beatified
14 May 1893 by Pope Leo XIII

Canonized
1 October 2000 by Pope John Paul II

Feast
9 July

Peter Sanz, O.P. (Ascó, 22 September 1680 – Fuzhou, 26 May 1747) (Catalan: Pere Sans i Jordá, Spanish: Pedro Sans i Jordá) was a Catalan Dominican friar who was sent as a missionary bishop to China. He was declared a martyr and canonized by the Catholic Church.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Mission in China
3 Martyrdom
4 Beatification and canonization
5 References

Early life[edit]
Sanz was born 22 September 1680 in Ascó, Ribera d’Ebre, in the Catalan region of Spain. In 1697 he professed religious vows as a member of the Dominican Order in Lerida. After completing his theological studies, he was ordained a priest on 22 September 1704.[1]
Mission in China[edit]
Sanz later volunteered and was accepted to serve in China. He was sent to the Philippines in 1713 to prepare for this mission, where he studied the Chinese language for two years. He then entered China with a small band of fellow friars, where he began a ministry which lasted over 30 years.[2] In January 1728, the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith named him as Coadjutor Vicar Apostolic of Fujian, for which he was consecrated a bishop on 22 February 1730 by the Bishop of Nanking, with the new titular see of Maurocastrum. He succeeded to the office of Vicar in January 1732, upon the death of Friar Magino Ventallol, O.P., who had been unable to be consecrated a bishop during the thirteen years of his administration.[3]
Martyrdom[edit]
Sanz was arrested by imperial authorities in 1741, along with four other friars. They suffered torture and a long imprisonment in Fuzhou. Finally, on 26 May 1747, Sanz was beheaded. In October 1748, word came that one of his companions had been named his coadjutor bishop by the Holy See. The other friars were executed immediately upon that news.[4]
Beatification and canonization[edit]
He and his companions were beatified by Pope Leo XIII on 14 May 1893. They were included among a group of 120 saints known collectively as the “Martyr Saints of China” who were canonized on 1 October 2000 by Pope John Paul II. The group was given the feast day of 9 July.[5]
References[edit]

^ Catholic Hierarchy “Bishop St. Peter Sanz”
^ Companions Martyrs of China Third Order of Penance of St. Dominic “The M
야플티비

2011 in South Korean football

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The 2011 season began on 5 March 2011 for the K-League and Challengers League, with the Korea National League starting 7 days later on 12 March 2011.

Contents

1 Honors
2 League tables

2.1 K-League

2.1.1 Regular season
2.1.2 Championship

2.2 Korea National League

2.2.1 Regular season
2.2.2 Championship playoff

2.3 Challengers League
2.4 WK-League

2.4.1 Regular season
2.4.2 Playoffs

3 Cups

3.1 Korean FA Cup
3.2 K-League Cup

3.2.1 Group Round
3.2.2 Knockout Round

3.3 National League Cup

3.3.1 Group Round
3.3.2 Knockout Round

3.4 Challengers Cup

4 South Korean clubs’ performance in Asia

4.1 Champions League
4.2 Asian Challenge Cup

5 National team

5.1 2011 AFC Asian Cup
5.2 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification
5.3 Friendlies

6 References

Honors[edit]

League

Competition
Start
End
Champions

K-League
5 March
4 December
Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors

Korea National League
12 March
20 November
Ulsan Mipo Dolphins

Challengers League
5 March
13 November
Gyeongju Citizen

WK-League
21 March
29 September
Goyang Daekyo Kangaroos

Cup

Competition
Start
End
Winners

Korean FA Cup
12 March
15 October
Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma

K-League Cup
16 March
13 July
Ulsan Hyundai

National League Cup
19 June
30 June
Ulsan Mipo Dolphins

Challengers Cup
5 August
13 August
Icheon Citizen

League tables[edit]
K-League[edit]
Regular season[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation

1
Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors !Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors (C) (Q)
30
18
9
3
67
32
+35
63
2011 K-League Championship and
2012 AFC Champions League Group stage

2
Pohang Steelers !Pohang Steelers (Q)
30
17
8
5
59
33
+26
59
2011 K-League Championship and
2012 AFC Champions League Qualifying play-off2

3
FC Seoul !FC Seoul
30
16
7
7
56
38
+18
55
2011 K-League Championship and
the winner of Playoffs among four
qualifies to
2012 AFC Champions League Group stage2

4
Suwon Samsung Bluewings !Suwon Samsung Bluewings
30
17
4
9
51
33
+18
55

5
Busan I’Park !Busan I’Park
30
13
7
10
49
43
+6
46

6
Ulsan Hyundai !Ulsan Hyundai (O) (Q)
30
13
7
10
33
29
+4
46

7
Chunnam Dragons !Chunnam Dragons
30
11
10
9
33
29
+4
43

8
Gyeongnam FC !Gyeongnam FC
30
12
6
12
41
40
+1
42

9
Jeju United !
섹파

Kelly O’Dwyer

The Honourable
Kelly O’Dwyer
MP

Assistant Treasurer of Australia / Minister for Revenue and Financial Services

Incumbent

Assumed office
21 September 2015

Prime Minister
Malcolm Turnbull

Preceded by
Josh Frydenberg

Minister for Small Business

In office
21 September 2015 – 19 July 2016

Prime Minister
Malcolm Turnbull

Preceded by
Bruce Billson

Succeeded by
Michael McCormack

Member of the Australian Parliament
for Higgins

Incumbent

Assumed office
5 December 2009

Preceded by
Peter Costello

Personal details

Born
Kelly Megan O’Dwyer
(1977-03-31) 31 March 1977 (age 39)
Melbourne, Australia

Nationality
Australian

Political party
Liberal Party of Australia

Spouse(s)
Jon Mant

Children
1

Residence
South Yarra, Victoria

Alma mater
University of Melbourne

Profession
Lawyer

Website
Official website

Kelly Megan O’Dwyer (born 31 March 1977) is an Australian politician and member for the Division of Higgins in the Australian House of Representatives. On 5 December 2009, at the 2009 Higgins by-election, O’Dwyer was elected to succeed former Treasurer Peter Costello.[1] She served as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer in the Abbott Government from December 2014. In September 2015, she was promoted to cabinet as Minister for Small Business and Assistant Treasurer in the Turnbull Government.[2][3]
Following the 2016 federal election, O’Dwyer was appointed federal Minister for Revenue and Financial Services.[4]

Contents

1 Early career
2 Political career

2.1 Entry to federal politics

2.1.1 Preselection sexism claims

2.2 Minister

2.2.1 2016 federal election

3 Personal life
4 References
5 External links

Early career[edit]
O’Dwyer was educated at Presbyterian Ladies’ College and the University of Melbourne, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws.[5] After working as a solicitor for Freehills in Melbourne,[5] O’Dwyer spent four years as an senior advisor to Peter Costello,[6] then the member for the federal division of Higgins and the Federal Treasurer, later becoming an executive at the National Australia Bank.[7]
Political career[edit]
Entry to federal politics[edit]
Costello decided in 2009 not to seek another term of office at the next federal election.[8] On 17 September 2009, O’Dwyer was pre-selected to stand as the Liberal Party candidate for Higgins at the next election.[9] Peter Costello then announced his resignation from Parliament in October 2009.
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