Saugus, Massachusetts

“Saugus” redirects here. For other uses, see Saugus (disambiguation).

Saugus, Massachusetts

Town

Saugus Town Hall

Seal

Location in Essex County in Massachusetts

Coordinates: 42°27′53″N 71°00′38″W / 42.46472°N 71.01056°W / 42.46472; -71.01056Coordinates: 42°27′53″N 71°00′38″W / 42.46472°N 71.01056°W / 42.46472; -71.01056

Country
United States

State
Massachusetts

County
Essex

Settled
1629

Incorporated
1815

Government

 • Type
Town Manager–Board of Selectmen/Representative town meeting

 • Town Manager
Scott Crabtree

 • Board of Selectmen
Debra Panetta
Scott Brazis
Jennifer D’Eon
Jeffrey Cicolini
Mark Mitchell

Area

 • Total
11.8 sq mi (30.6 km2)

 • Land
10.8 sq mi (28.0 km2)

 • Water
1.0 sq mi (2.6 km2)

Elevation
21 ft (6 m)

Population (2010)

 • Total
26,628

 • Density
2,300/sq mi (870/km2)

Time zone
Eastern (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
Eastern (UTC-4)

ZIP code
01906

Area code(s)
339 / 781

FIPS code
25-60015

GNIS feature ID
0619454

Website
Town of Saugus, Official Web Site

Saugus is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States, in the Greater Boston area. The population was 26,628 at the 2010 census.[1]

Contents

1 History
2 Geography and transportation
3 Demographics
4 Government

4.1 Town manager
4.2 Board of Selectmen
4.3 School committee
4.4 Town Meeting

5 Media
6 Points of interest
7 Notable people
8 Movies and television shows filmed in Saugus
9 References
10 External links

History[edit]
Saugus was first settled in 1629. Saugus is an Native American (Algonquin) name believed to mean “great” or “extended”. In 1637, the territory known as Saugus (which also contained the present day cities and towns of Swampscott, Nahant, Lynn, Lynnfield, Reading, and Wakefield) was renamed Lin or Lynn, after King’s Lynn in Norfolk, England.[2]
In 1646, the Saugus Iron Works, then called Hammersmith, began operations. It was the first integrated iron works in North America as well as one of the most technologically advanced in the world. The Iron Works produced over one ton of iron a day, but was not financially successful. It closed around 1670.[3]
In September 1687, Major Samuel Appleton was said to have given a speech from a rocky cliff near the Iron Works denouncing the tyranny o
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