Fungia scruposa

Fungia scruposa

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Cnidaria

Class:
Anthozoa

Order:
Scleractinia

Family:
Fungiidae

Genus:
Fungia

Species:
F. scruposa

Binomial name

Fungia scruposa
Klunzinger, 1879[2]

Fungia scruposa is a species of coral that is the first to have been observed to eat jellyfish.[3] It was described by Klunzinger in 1879 and has a diameter of around 25 centimetres (9.8 in). It is rated as a least-concern species.

Contents

1 Description
2 Distribution
3 Taxonomy
4 References

Description[edit]
They are around 25 centimetres (9.8 in) in diameter and normally eat a variety of food from bacteria to mesozooplankton measuring 1 mm in diameter. During an algal bloom in 2009 researchers observed the coral consuming the jellyfish Aurelia aurita. This was the first time such behaviour has been seen in the wild. It is not known how the coral captures jellyfish.[4] This coral is unusual in that it consists of a single polyp up to 25 centimetres (9.8 in) across. It may have caught the jellyfish with its tentacles in the same way as some sea anemones feed on other jellyfish species.[3]
Its polyps have diameters of up to 240 millimetres (9.4 in) and are oval or circular. The species may contain tentacular lobes and it has dense septa. It is blue or brown in colour.[5] Its maximum diameter is around 38 centimetres (15 in).[1]
Distribution[edit]
F. scruposa is found in the eastern and western Indian Ocean, the eastern central, northwestern and western central Pacific Ocean, Japan, the East China Sea, the Red Sea, and eastern Australia.[1] No population figures are available for the species but it is believed to be common and is found at depths between 1 and 27 metres (3 ft 3 in and 88 ft 7 in) on the slopes of reefs. A 1991 study of specimens found that 51% were bleached. It is threatened by bleaching, disease, climate change, fishing, preadators, and human activities. F. scruposa is classified as a least concern species by the IUCN.[1]
Taxonomy[edit]
It was described by Klunzinger in 1879 as Fungia scruposa.[2] The species is also known by synonym Fungia corona (Döderlein, 1901).[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c d e “Fungia scruposa”. IUCN Red List. Retrieved 17 August 2015. 
^ a b WoRMS (2010). “Fungia scruposa Klunzinger, 1879”. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2012-12-21.&#160
섹스

Joseph V. Graff

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Joseph V. Graff

Joseph Verdi Graff (July 1, 1854 – November 10, 1921) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.
Born in Terre Haute, Indiana, Graff was graduated from the Terre Haute High School, and attended Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana, one year. He moved to Delavan, Illinois, in 1873 and engaged in mercantile pursuits. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1879 and commenced practice in Delavan, Illinois. He moved to Pekin, Illinois, and continued the practice of law.
Graff was elected as an inspector of the Pekin public schools in 1891 and served as president of the board of education. He served as delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1892.
Graff was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth and to the seven succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1895-March 3, 1911). He served as chairman of the Committee on Claims (Fifty-sixth through Fifty-eighth Congresses). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910 to the Sixty-second Congress. He continued the practice of law in Peoria, Illinois, where he had moved in 1899. He also engaged in banking. He died in Peoria, Illinois, November 10, 1921. He was interred in Glendale Cemetery, Washington, Tazewell County, Illinois.
References[edit]

United States Congress. “Joseph V. Graff (id: G000351)”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

United States House of Representatives

Preceded by
Benjamin F. Funk
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 14th congressional district
1895-1903
Succeeded by
Benjamin F. Marsh

Preceded by
Thomas J. Selby
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 16th congressional district
1903-1911
Succeeded by
Claude U. Stone

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 70840714
LCCN: n2007040698
US Congress: G000351

밤헌터

Ann Farnsworth-Alvear

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This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (January 2010)

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Ann Farnsworth-Alvear (born Huntington, New York) is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. She authored the book Dulcinea in the Factory: Myths, Morals, Men, and Women in Colombia’s Industrial Experiment that was published by Duke University Press. In the book she identifies two crucial turning points in the history of the factories of Antioquia: the first being the radical unionization of previously unorganized workers, the second being when technological innovations and the rise of newly trained industrial engineers changed the dynamic of worker and management relations.[1] The book won the Bolton-Johnson Prize of the Conference on Latin American History as well as the Allan Sharlin Prize of the Social Science History Association[2]
References[edit]

^ Roldan, Mary. Book Review: Dulcinea in the Factory, Hispanic American Historical Review 81.2 (2001) 406-408
^ Ann Farnsworth-Alvear page Archived May 30, 2008, at the Wayback Machine., University of Pennsylvania, Department of History.

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 36250361
ISNI: 0000 0001 1054 5619
SUDOC: 075186888

성인만화

Aquinas College, Southport

Aquinas College, Southport

Location

Southport, Queensland
Australia

Information

Type
Private, Coeducational, Secondary, Day school

Motto
English: “Living Our Commitment”

Denomination
Roman Catholic, Christian Brothers

Established
1964

Founder
Archbishop James Duhig

Headmaster
Mr. Peter Hurley

Website
www.aquinas.qld.edu.au

Aquinas College is a Roman Catholic, coeducational, day school, located in Southport, Queensland, Australia.
See also[edit]

List of schools in Queensland

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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Christian Brothers secondary schools in Australia

Aquinas College, Albury
Aquinas College, Perth
Aquinas College, Southport
Christian Brothers College, Adelaide
Christian Brothers College, Fremantle
Christian Brothers’ High School, Lewisham
Christian Brothers College, Manly
Christian Brothers College, St Kilda
De La Salle College, Malvern
Gilroy Santa Maria College, Ingham
Good Shepherd Catholic College, Mount Isa
Ignatius Park College
Mount Isa Catholic High School
Our Lady of the Southern Cross College, Dalby
Parade College
Rostrevor College
Shalom Catholic College, Bundaberg
St. Bernard’s College
St Brendan’s College
St Columban’s College, Caboolture
St Edmunds College, Ipswich
St Edmund’s College, Canberra
St Edward’s College, East Gosford
St Joseph’s College, Gregory Terrace
St Joseph’s College, Geelong
St Joseph’s College, Nudgee
St Kieran’s College
St Kevin’s College
St Leo’s Catholic College
St Laurence’s College
St Mary’s Cathedral College
St Mary’s College, Toowoomba
St Mary’s College, Dalby
St Patrick’s College, Ballarat
St Patrick’s College, Gympie
St Patrick’s College, Shorncliffe
St Patrick’s College, Strathfield
St Paul’s Catholic College, Manly
St Paul’s College, Adelaide
St Pius X College
St Teresa’s College, Abergowrie
St Virgil’s College
The Cathedral College, Rockhampton
Trinity College
Waverley College
Xavier High School, Albury

Defunct schools

Chanel College
Cathedral College, East Melbourne
Christian Brothers School, Balmain
Christian Brothers College, Burwood
Christian Brothers’ College, Perth
Christian Brothers College, Rose Bay
St Augustine’s College, Yarraville
St Joseph’s College Melbourne
St Patrick’s College, Goulburn
St Patrick’s Boy School, Perth
St. Paul’s College, Ballarat
St Thomas Aquinas College, Albury
Christian Brothers College, Bondi Beach

Coordinates: 27°58′33″S 153°22′58″E / 27.975737°S 153.382827°E / -27.975737; 153.382
일베야

Ismael Moreno Pino

His Excellency
Ismael Moreno Pino

Personal details

Born
(1927-02-15)15 February 1927
Mérida, Yucatán,
Mexico

Died
15 August 2013(2013-08-15) (aged 86)
Mexico City

Nationality
Mexican

Political party
independent

Spouse(s)
Guadalupe Mercedes Hemosillo de Moreno

Children
Patricia
Ismael
María de Lourdes

Alma mater
UNAM
Georgetown University

Profession
Jurist
Statesman
Diplomat
Author

Religion
Roman Catholic

Ismael Moreno Pino (February 15, 1927 – August 15, 2013) was a Mexican jurist, senior diplomat and author.[1] During a distinguished career spanning forty years, he held several important diplomatic positions. In the Foreign Office, where he began his career in 1952, amongst other positions, he served as Undersecretary for Multilateral Affairs (1964-1965), Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs (1960-1964), and Chief of Western Hemisphere Affairs (1952-1958).
A member of the Diplomatic Service since 1958, he was appointed to the rank of Ambassador in 1965, representing his country in Chile, West Germany, the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington D.C.,[2] the United Nations offices in Geneva, Switzerland, Venezuela, Peru, the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Dominican Republic. Prior to retiring in 1992, he served as Head of the Diplomatic Service.
During his career, he played an important role in the disarmament conference which culminated in the signing of the Treaty of Tlatelolco (1969) which prohibited nuclear weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, serving as a delegate in the OPANAL conferences and collaborating closely with Alfonso Garcia Robles, who in 1982 won the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts.
In 1982, President José Lopez Portillo named him an Eminent Ambassador (Embajador Eminente), a special honor reserved by law to only ten ambassadors who have made a distinguished contribution to Mexican Foreign Policy. He was also a Professor of International Organizations at the Mexico City College. The author of several treatises on International Relations and International Law, he is nowadays particularly remembered for his authorship of Diplomacy (1998) which has educated generations of diplomats in Latin America.
Born in Mérida, Yucatán in 1927 to financier Ramón Moreno Sánchez and Aida Pino Camára, he obtained a Bachelor of Law Degree (LL.B.) from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in 1950, with the thesis “El cuerpo consular mexicano al servici
우리넷

Orbit Jet

Orbit Jet

First appearance
1954 (1954)

Affiliation
Office of Space Affairs
Earth

General characteristics

Registry
XV-2

Armaments
Missiles

Defences
Cloaking device

Propulsion
Rocket engines

Chassis
Winged V-2-shaped tail-sitter

The Orbit Jet was a fictional spaceship in the 1954 TV series Rocky Jones, Space Ranger. It strongly resembled a V-2 rocket in overall form, with a very prominent exhaust plume when flying, but had wings in addition to tailfins (even its radio callsign, “XV-2” relates it to that seminal World War II design). There were references in the dialog to the engines being “atomic”. The Orbit Jet had a crew of two (pilot and copilot), but often had three or four others on board depending on the mission and destination. It often flew from Earth to inhabited moons of Jupiter and Saturn, which it seemed to reach in hours or days of time within the story.
Later in the series, another ship, the Silver Moon, was used, but it appeared almost identical to the Orbit Jet.
The Orbit Jet introduced many features that would become standard equipment on later TV and movie spaceships:

An electronic viewscreen (instead of a simple window or porthole)
A fantastically complicated control panel (without an airplane-styled control wheel or stick)
Power doors opening side-to-side as one approaches
Subspace radio (the “Astrophone”) that allowed instantaneous communications over interplanetary distances
Artificial gravity as an explained feature and plot element
A cloaking device that rendered the ship invisible.

References[edit]

This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

http://reflectionsonfilmandtelevision.blogspot.com/2006/01/cult-tv-flashback-18-rocky-jones-space.html
http://www.cathuria.com/bcd/bcrocky.htm
http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/movie.html?v_id=6018

도신닷컴

Pierre-Denis Martin (1663–1742)

Pierre-Denis Martin (1663 – 1742) was a French painter of historical subjects, battles, hunts, and architectural views, particularly of royal residences, such as the Palace of Versailles and the Château de Compiègne. He was also known as Martin the Younger (le jeune) or Martin des Gobelins (because he was employed at the Gobelins Manufactory).[1]
P.-D. Martin was born in Paris, and according to d’Argenville, he was the cousin of Jean-Baptiste Martin, while Pierre-Jean Mariette says he was J.-B. Martin’s nephew and pupil. He is also said to have been the pupil of Adam François van der Meulen and the Parrocel. He produced a series of paintings at the Château de Choisy, which are now in the Versailles Museum.[1]
The dictionary of artists by Bellier de la Chavignerie and Auvray incorrectly attributes several paintings by Pierre-Denis Martin in the Versailles Museum to Jean-Baptiste Martin.[1][2]
P.-D. Martin died in Paris.
Gallery[edit]

Battle of Fleurus, 1690.

The Château de Marly, 1724.

Palace of Versailles, 1722.

Louis XIV, visiting the Hôtel Royal des Invalides, 1706.

The Turkish ambassador Mehmet Efendi leaving the Tuileries Garden after an audience with Louis XV, 1721

References[edit]
Notes

^ a b c “Martin, Pierre Denis” in Benezit 2006, vol. 9, p. 372.
^ Bellier & Auvray 1885, vol. 2, p. 41.

Sources

Bellier de la Chavignerie, Émile; Auvray, Louis (1882, 1885, 1887). Dictionnaire général des artistes de l’école française. Paris: Renouard. Vols. 1: A–L (1882), 2: M–Z (1885), and supplement (1887) at Google Books.
Benezit, Emmanuel; et al. (2006). Benezit – Dictionary of Artists. Paris: Gründ. ISBN 9782700030709.

External links[edit]

Media related to Pierre-Denis Martin at Wikimedia Commons
From Direction des Musées de France
List of works at Joconde: Portail des collections des musées de France
Portfolio of works

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WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 19146153103705251920
ISNI: 0000 0001 2037 2264
GND: 129909742
BNF: cb14913128v (data)
ULAN: 500026815

This article about a French painter born in the 17th century is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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야동

1942 Boston Braves season

1942 Boston Braves

Major League affiliations

National League (since 1876)

Location

Braves Field (since 1915)

Boston, Massachusetts (since 1871)

Results

Record
59–89 (.399)

League place
7th

Other information

Owner(s)
J.A. Robert Quinn

Manager(s)
Casey Stengel

Local radio
WAAB
(Jim Britt)

 < Previous season     Next season  >

The 1942 Boston Braves season was the 72nd in franchise history.

Contents

1 Regular season

1.1 Season standings
1.2 Record vs. opponents
1.3 Roster

2 Player stats

2.1 Batting

2.1.1 Starters by position
2.1.2 Other batters

2.2 Pitching

2.2.1 Starting pitchers
2.2.2 Other pitchers
2.2.3 Relief pitchers

3 Farm system
4 Notes
5 References

Regular season[edit]

May 13, 1942: Jim Tobin of the Braves became the first Major League Baseball pitcher to hit three home runs in one game.[1]

Season standings[edit]

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National League
W
L
Pct.
GB
Home
Road

St. Louis Cardinals
106
48
0.688

60–17
46–31

Brooklyn Dodgers
104
50
0.675
2
57–22
47–28

New York Giants
85
67
0.559
20
47–31
38–36

Cincinnati Reds
76
76
0.500
29
38–39
38–37

Pittsburgh Pirates
66
81
0.449
36½
41–34
25–47

Chicago Cubs
68
86
0.442
38
36–41
32–45

Boston Braves
59
89
0.399
44
33–36
26–53

Philadelphia Phillies
42
109
0.278
62½
23–51
19–58

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1942 National League Records

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Sources:
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Team
BOS
BR
CHC
CIN
NYG
PHI
PIT
STL

Boston

6–16
13–9
5–16–1
8–12
14–8
7–12–1
6–16

Brooklyn
16–6

16–6
15–7
14–8–1
18–4
16–6
9–13

Chicago
9–13
6–16

13–9
9–13–1
14–8
11–11
6–16

Cincinnati
16–5–1
7–15
9–13

9–13
16–6
12–9–1
7–15

New York
12–8
8–14–1
13–9–1
13–9

17–5
15–7
7–15

Philadelphia
8–14
4–18
8–14
6–16
5–17

6–13
5–17

Pittsburgh
12–7–1
6–16
11–11
9–12–1
7–15
13–6

8–14–2

St. Louis
16–6
13–9
16–6
15–7
15–7
17–5
14–8–2

Roster[edit]

1942 Boston Braves

Roster

Pitchers

20 George Diehl

21 Bill Donovan

26 Tom Earley

19 Dick Errickson

24 Jim Hickey

17 Johnny Hutchings

18 Al Javery

29 Art Johnson

24 Frank LaManna

28 Johnny Sain

23 Manny Salvo

16 Warren Spahn

22 Jim Tobin

27 Lou Tost

16 Lefty Wallace

Catchers

11 Clyde Kluttz

 5 Ernie Lombardi

10 Phil Masi

Infielde
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